a props de nous-autres, about us

IMG0133

A brief Insight into Les Acadiens!

Cajuns;  French: les Cadiens or les Acadiens, are an ethnic group mainly living in the state of Louisiana, consisting in part of the descendants of Acadian exiles—French-speakers from L’Acadie in what are now the Maritimes of Eastern Canada. Many people of French origin in Louisiana who are not of Acadian origin identify with Acadian/Cajun culture and refer to themselves as Cajuns or Acadians. In Louisiana the terms Acadian and Cajun are often used as cultural synonyms without reference to actual descent from the deported Acadians. Today, the Cajuns make up a significant portion of south Louisiana’s population and have exerted an enormous impact on the state’s culture.

While Lower Louisiana had been settled by French colonists since the late 17th century, the Cajuns trace their roots to the influx of Acadian settlers after the Great Expulsion from their homeland during the French and British hostilities prior to the Seven Years’ War (1756 to 1763). The Acadia region to which modern Cajuns trace their origin consisted largely of what are now Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island plus parts of eastern Quebec and northern Maine. Since their establishment in Louisiana, the Cajuns have developed their own dialect, Cajun French, and developed a vibrant culture including folkways, music, and cuisine. The Acadiana region is heavily associated with them

Offering all the sights, sounds, taste, all the ingredients that are brought   to life, in our, Traditions, Culture, Food, Music, Dance, and Our Cajun Country Lives, Every Day!

Our Story

Acadia

The origin of the designation Acadia is credited to the explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano, commissioned by the King Francis I of France, who on his 16th-century map applied the ancient Greek name “Arcadia” to the entire Atlantic coast north of Virginia. “Arcadia” derives from the Arcadia district in Greece which since classical antiquity had the extended meanings of “refuge” or “idyllic place”. Samuel de Champlain fixed the orthography with the ‘r’ omitted in the 17th century. The term eventually came to apply only to the northern part of the coast in what is now Canada and New England.

It all started years ago, Offering Cajun Country to the World! We believe that the Cajun Experience is so unique, and We believe in Living it every day. So please join us on our journey and Experience Cajun everyday, It’s what We do!

History of Acadian ancestors

See also: Acadians, New France, and Expulsion of the Acadians

The British Conquest of French Acadia happened in 1710. Over the next 45 years, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During this period, Acadians participated in various militia operations against the British and maintained vital supply lines to the French fortress of Louisbourg and Fort Beausejour. ] During the French and Indian War (part of the Seven Years’ War and known by that name in Canada and Europe), the British sought to neutralize the Acadian military threat and to interrupt their vital supply lines to Louisbourg by deporting Acadians from Acadia.  During 1755–1763 Acadia consisted of parts of present-day Canada: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and the Gaspe Peninsula in the province of Quebec. The deportation of the Acadians from these areas has become known as the Great Upheaval or Le Grand Dérangement.

The Acadians’ migration from Canada was spurred by the Treaty of Paris (1763) which ended the war. The treaty terms provided 18 months for unrestrained emigration. Many Acadians moved to the region of the Atakapa in present-day Louisiana, often travelling via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti).  Joseph Broussard led the first group of 200 Acadians to arrive in Louisiana on February 27, 1765,

aboard the Santo Domingo.  On April 8, 1765, he was appointed militia captain and commander of the “Acadians of the Atakapas” region in St. Martinville. Some of the settlers wrote to their family scattered around the Atlantic to encourage them to join them at New Orleans. For example, Jean-Baptiste Semer, wrote to his father in France:

My dear father you can come here boldly with my dear mother and all the other Acadian families. They will always be better off than in France. There are neither duties nor taxes to pay and the more one works, the more one earns without doing harm to anyone.

— Jean-Baptiste Semer, 1766

The Acadians were scattered throughout the eastern seaboard. Families were split and put on ships with different destinations. ] Many ended up west of the Mississippi River in what was then French-colonized Louisiana, including territory as far north as Dakota territory. France had ceded the colony to Spain in 1762, prior to their defeat by Britain and two years before the first Acadians began settling in Louisiana. The interim French officials provided land and supplies to the new settlers. The Spanish governor, Bernardo de Gálvez, later proved to be hospitable, permitting the Acadians to continue to speak their language, practice their native religion (Roman Catholicism – which was also the official religion of Spain), and otherwise pursue their livelihoods with minimal interference. Some families and individuals did travel north through the Louisiana territory to set up homes as far north as Wisconsin. Cajuns fought in the American Revolution. Although they fought for Spanish General Galvez, their contribution to the winning of the war has been recognized.

“Galvez leaves New Orleans with an army of Spanish regulars and the Louisiana militia made up of 600 Cajun volunteers and captures the British strongholds of Fort Bute at Bayou Manchac, across from the Acadian settlement at St. Gabriel. And on September 21, they attack and capture Baton Rouge.”

A review of participating soldiers shows many common Cajun names among those who fought in the battles of Baton Rouge and West Florida. The Galvez Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was formed in memory of those soldiers. The Acadians’ joining the fight against the British was partially a reaction to the British having evicted them from Acadia.

The Spanish colonial government settled the earliest group of Acadian exiles west of New Orleans, in what is now south-central Louisiana—an area known at the time as Attakapas, and later the center of the Acadiana region. As Brasseaux wrote, “The oldest of the pioneer communities . . . Fausse Point, was established near present-day Loreauville by late June 1765.” ] The Acadians shared the swamps, bayous and prairies with the Attakapa and Chitimacha Native American tribes.

After the end of the American Revolutionary War, about 1,500 more Acadians arrived in New Orleans. About 3,000 Acadians had been deported to France during the Great Upheaval. In 1785, about 1,500 were authorized to emigrate to Louisiana, often to be reunited with their families, or because they could not settle in France. Living in a relatively isolated region until the early 20th century, Cajuns today are largely assimilated into the mainstream society and culture. Some Cajuns live in communities outside Louisiana. Also, some people identify themselves as Cajun culturally despite lacking Acadian ancestry.

250px-Acadiana_parishes_map

cazanhotel

Big Mamou, Evangeline Parish. Cazan Hotel, down town Mamou!

Our Story

It all started years ago, Offering Cajun Country to the World! We believe that the Cajun Experience is so unique, and We believe in Living it every day. So please join us on our journey and Experience Cajun everyday, It’s what We do!

Want to know more?

Check out the Story of les Cadiens !


Ask !